Tag Archives: Tehillim

Seder Tu B’Shevat

IMG_2466-Figs“Taste and see that Hashem is good…” advises King David (Tehillim-Psalms 34:9) but we might wonder: what does the sense of taste have to do with the ability to see? The experience of Tu B’Shevat is a perfect example of how spiritual insight can actually be enhanced and strengthened through developing our sense of taste.

Once a year, on Tu B’Shevat, we are invited back into the Garden of Eden to restore the integrity of humanity and repair all that was destroyed by Adam and Chava (Eve) when they ate the fruit of the primordial ILaN – “fruit bearing tree”.

IMG_2477Seder Tu b’Shevat

Many celebrate Rosh HaShanah L’ILaN(oTH) the “New Year of the Tree(s)” with a festive meal or “Seder” – that includes tasting at least 12 different kinds of fruits. Taking part in this meal, and saying the blessings on it, actually restores a glimmer of paradise to its rightful centrality in our lives.

Four Worlds

To appreciate the powerful significance of this holiday and gain more of what it has to offer, we need to know, first of all, that there are four worlds. Beginning with the one that is most hidden, these worlds are:

1) Olam HaAtziluth “Realm of Proximity” – “near” the Unknowable Creator, Source of all good/light
2) Olam HaBriyah – “Realm of Creation” – the “throne room” of Hashem Yisborach
3) Olam HaYetzirah – “Realm of Formation” – the spiritual realm and all that it contains
4) Olam HaAsiyah – “Realm of Action” – the physical universe and all that it contains

Whatever we think, say, or do affects all four worlds — profoundly and eternally. Depending on our moment-to-moment life choices, we allow more light to permeate the physical world from Olam HaAtziluth, or we block that light.

At certain times, we are given a chance to create unusually large conduits (“KayLIM“) for Hashem’s blessing/light, and Tu B’Shevat is a window to such an opportunity.

Simply through enjoying the taste of different fruits, and saying the appropriate blessings, we actually correct the devastating mistake made by Adam and Chava when they helped themselves — prematurely — to the Tree of Knowledge.

Tasting 12 Different Fruits helps restore mankind’s relationship with this “Tree of Knowledge”. In Olam HaBriyah, the most refined of the knowable worlds, we taste not less than four — preferably ten — fruits that are entirely edible and do not have any unusable KLiPaH – “shell” – inside or out. These include: grapes/raisins, figs, blueberries, apples, pears, raspberries, kiwis, quince, carob, and similar fruits.

pomegbranchsky4x4To regain access to the original “ILaN” (fruit bearing tree) from which all understanding streams, in Olam HaYetzirah, we taste not less than four — preferably ten — fruits that have an edible exterior but inedible  interior or pit. These include: olives, dates, apricots, loquats, persimmons, cherries, peaches, plums, and similar fruits.

To repair the damage done in Olam HaAsiyah, we taste not less than four – preferably ten — fruits that have an inedible exterior, but edible interior, such as: pomegranates, orange, pomello, grapefruit, walnuts, almonds, chestnuts, pistachio nuts, hazelnuts, pecans, etc.

The Seder

The order of priority in blessings on food is:
1. Hamotzi – Bread
2. Mezonoth (goods made from grain)
3. wine or grape juice, both red and white
4. olive
5. date
6. grape/raisin
7. fig
8. pomegranate
9. all other fruits, including ETHRoG (citron), nuts, etc.
10. fruits on which the blessing HaADaMaH is said (fruits that do not grow on a perennial tree) , such as pineapple, banana, papaya, etc.
11. foods on which the blessing SHeHaKoL is said, such as popcorn, watermelon seeds, beer (it’s made from barley!), etc.
12. the various blessing on fragrances

Taste, see, and enjoy the day!

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13. Shemoth 5776

13. Shemoth 5776 ~ The Treasure and the Bridge

Shemos 5776_City_Park_Bayou_Bridge_WikimediaOnce upon a time a man dreamed that a treasure was buried under a bridge in Vienna so he traveled there to find it. But when he arrived, a guard confronted him. Hoping to bribe the official into joining his quest, the traveler told the story of his dream, but the guard only laughed.

“I also dreamed about a treasure, but do I go chasing after it? Of course not!” He then told how, in his own dream, a treasure was hidden in a certain city at a certain address. Realizing that the guard had described his own home, the traveler rushed back and found the treasure!

In his parable Rebbe Nachman alludes to many secrets. One of them is that the treasure is our voice – a unique symphony of colors and resonances that has never been heard before, and will never be heard again.

We’ve used our voice all our lives but to discover that it is actually a treasure, we need to travel to the “bridge” spanning all worlds, the teachings of the Tzadik.1

“These are the names of the Children of Israel who arrived…”

ואלה שמות בני ישראל הבאים

Burning Bush by permission of YoramRaanan.com_Thumbnail

Parshath Shemoth — “Burning Bush” by Yoram Raanan. Courtesy of www.YoramRaanan.com

In this week’s parsha, Shemoth, rearranging the final letters of the opening words spells תהלים–Tehillim (Psalms). Hashem always sends the cure before He sends the illness, and so before the exile in Egypt began, the antidote was already prepared: Sefer Tehillim. 2

Through vocalization, even a whisper, the power locked inside the letters, words, and phrases of Sefer Tehillim is activated. This is the antidote to the exiles that began so long ago in Egypt. May we soon be free!

Good Shabbos — Shabbath Shalom!

A.M.

Show 2 footnotes

  1. Rav Yehiel Michel Dorfman ז”ל, oral tradition
  2. Lekutey Moharan Tanina 73
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